This unique continuing education program for adults provides a comprehensive and stimulating view
of our region’s natural history and conservation issues.

Open to adults 18 years of age or older, professionals and amateurs alike.

Fall 2021 Courses

Fall 2021 NHFS Courses
Human Ecology (September 13 - November 15)

FALL-NHFS Human Ecology 01
FALL-NHFS Human Ecology 02
FALL-NHFS Human Ecology 03
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HUMAN ECOLOGY

NATH8280E, 3 CEUs

As human populations and demands for goods increase our species cannot escape the biological and physical constraints/impacts of food production, over-harvesting of natural resources, industrialization, and energy use. These impacts affect the quality of life for our species, as well as the species we share this planet with. These impacts include degradation of air and water quality, replacement of natural habitats with habitats of our own design, and global level climate change. Applying ecological principles, we will examine our role in pressing environmental problems and evaluate potential solutions, including renewable energy sources and sustainable food systems. The ecosystem services provided by the biota will need to be factored into these solutions. Recommended prior course: Introduction to Ecology (NATH1160E), or equivalent. Registration closes on September 8.

Class Schedule: September 13 - November 15, Mondays, 6–8 pm
Class Location: Online via Zoom
Field Trips: October 2 and 30 (third trip possible)
Course Fees: Zoom Lectures + 2 Field Trips: ANS members $300, nonmembers $330

Required Book:
• Environment and Society: A Reader. Schlottman, Christopher et al (editors). NYU Press, 2017.

About Your Instructor:

Sally Valdes

Sally Valdes

Sally Valdes is a retired Environmental Protection Specialist/Fishery Biologist, Division of Environmental Assessment, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Department of the Interior. Worked with BOEM's Environmental Studies Program; wrote sections of environmental impact statements. Subject matter included fish and fisheries, birds and bats, invasive species, impacts of climate change on wildlife. M.A. in Biology, University of Michigan. Ph.D. in Aquatic Ecology, Cornell University.

REGISTER ONLINE

Botany for Naturalists (September 14 - October 19)

FALL-NHFS Botany 02
FALL-NHFS Botany 01
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BOTANY FOR NATURALISTS

NATH7125E, 1.5 CEUs

This course will provide the nature enthusiast with a grounding in the science of plants. Green plants (and algae) provide the oxygen that supports life as we know it on earth. Learn about the internal workings of vascular and avascular plants, their life histories, special adaptations for growth and reproduction, and their place in ecological cycles. Two field trips are planned to local sites that feature great plant diversity.

This class is meant to provide a broad understanding of the internal functions of plants, in order to deepen the student’s understanding and appreciation of plants of all kinds. Recommended for anyone with an interest in plants and their development. Registration closes on September 8.

Class Schedule: September 14 - October 19 (no class on October 12), Tuesdays, 6–8 pm
Class Location: Online via Zoom
Field Trips: September 25 and October 9 (10 am-1 pm)
Course Fees: Zoom Lectures + 2 Field Trips: ANS members $190, nonmembers $220

Required Book: 
• Botany for Gardeners, third edition, by Brian Capon, Timber Press, 2010, ISBN 978-1604690958

Suggested Reading: 
• Any recent (within 5 years) college-level biology textbook would be a good background resource

About Your Instructor:

Sujata Roy

Sujata Roy

Sujata Roy is a Volunteer Naturalist with Montgomery Parks, leading programs for all ages at Black Hill Regional Park and Little Bennett Regional Park. She is an avid wildflower enthusiast, an active birder, and all-around nature lover. B.A., University of Chicago.

Microbial Ecology (October 27 - December 1)

FALL-NHFS Microbial Ecology 01
FALL-NHFS Microbial Ecology 02
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MICROBIAL ECOLOGY

NATH7300E, 1.5 CEUs

This course focuses on the biological and chemical contributions of microorganisms (bacteria, Archaea, protists, algae) to higher-order systems. The contribution of microbes to microbiomes within higher plant and animal organisms; soil, ocean, and freshwater ecosystems; global nutrient cycling; and, human-designed and –adapted environmental systems will be examined. Two field trips will explore the role of microbes in local ecosystems. Registration closes on September 8.

Class Schedule: October 27 - December 1, Wednesdays, 6–8 pm
Class Location: Online via Zoom
Field Trips: Saturday, October 30; second field trip TBA
Course Fees: Zoom Lectures + 2 Field Trips: ANS members $190, nonmembers $220

Recommended Books:
No book required

About Your Instructor:

Lynn Rust

Lynn Rust

Lynn Rust, Ph.D. is a Scientific Review Officer for the National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health. Previously a research professor at the Center of Excellence for Vaccine Research, University of Connecticut. She is a volunteer team lead for the ANS Water Quality Monitoring Program. Ph.D., Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester.

What students say about
Natural History Field Studies:

“I am incredibly grateful for the opportunity to take classes in the NHFS program. Most environmental education is aimed at children and youth. Because nature programming wasn’t a part of my suburban childhood (and I might not have cared about it or retained it in any case) I am thrilled to be able to learn about natural history as an adult – ‘when the student is ready, the teacher appears.’ Thanks to the Audubon Naturalist Society, natural history is becoming a passion.”
- R. Gray, NHFS Student