Dr Candice Duncan

Dr. Candice Duncan is a lecturer in the Environmental Science and Technology Department at the University of Maryland, College Park. She earned her PhD from the University of Arizona’s Soil, Water and Environmental Science program (now known as the Department of Environmental Science).  She earned an MS in Earth Science from North Carolina Central University, where she studied in the Department of Environmental, Earth and Geospatial Sciences. She is an environmental scientist through knowledge and experience gained as an analytical chemist, soil scientist and hydrologist. Her work focuses on the transport and characterization of organic contaminants in the vadose zone (the Earth's terrestrial subsurface that extends from the surface to the regional groundwater table). Dr. Duncan dabbles in archeology through the New York African Burial Ground project with Howard University, studying trace metals in grave soils using non-invasive analytical technology combining soil science and chemistry.  This work postulates the diet of interred free and enslaved Africans of the New Amsterdam Colony located in what is now Lower Manhattan.  She has advised undergraduate students majoring in environmental science and technology. She has mentored undergraduate and graduate students in research related from legacy phosphorus in Chesapeake Bay soils to contaminant leachate from recycled asphalt pavement in highway construction. She is a community engagement promoter, science advocate, citizen scientist, STEM educator, and mentor. 

Dr. Candice Duncan is a lecturer in the Environmental Science and Technology Department at the University of Maryland, College Park. She earned her PhD from the University of Arizona’s Soil, Water and Environmental Science program (now known as the Department of Environmental Science). She earned an MS in Earth Science from North Carolina Central University, where she studied in the Department of Environmental, Earth and Geospatial Sciences.

She is an environmental scientist through knowledge and experience gained as an analytical chemist, soil scientist and hydrologist. Her work focuses on the transport and characterization of organic contaminants in the vadose zone (the Earth's terrestrial subsurface that extends from the surface to the regional groundwater table). Dr. Duncan dabbles in archeology through the New York African Burial Ground project with Howard University, studying trace metals in grave soils using non-invasive analytical technology combining soil science and chemistry.  This work postulates the diet of interred free and enslaved Africans of the New Amsterdam Colony located in what is now Lower Manhattan.

She has advised undergraduate students majoring in environmental science and technology. She has mentored undergraduate and graduate students in research related from legacy phosphorus in Chesapeake Bay soils to contaminant leachate from recycled asphalt pavement in highway construction. She is a community engagement promoter, science advocate, citizen scientist, STEM educator, and mentor.