Category Archives: Uncategorized

NL3 Natali Fani-González

Naturally Latinos 3 - Natali Fani-González


Keynote Speaker


 

Naturally Latinos 3 - Natali Fani-Gonzalez

Natali Fani-González

Vice-Chair, Montgomery County Planning Board

Appointed in October 2014, Natali Fani-González is the Vice-Chair of the Montgomery County Planning Board and the first Latinx and first millennial to serve on the five-member Board. Since her appointment, Natali has made significant contributions to the Board, Planning Department and Department of Parks to engage diverse communities. She has been involved with several planning efforts, including the Bethesda Downtown Sector Plan, 2016 Subdivision Staging Policy, Montgomery Village Master Plan, Greater Lyttonsville Sector Plan, Veirs Mills Corridor Master Plan and Bicycle Master Plan. In April 2018, she participated in the national conference of the American Planning Association on a panel about public outreach for hard-to-reach audiences and has been a speaker at several regional planning events.

Her passion for community advocacy has prompted Natali Fani-González to speak about civil rights and economic justice on noteworthy occasions such as the 40th Anniversary of the March on Washington. She has been the recipient of several prestigious awards: Washingtonian Magazine honored Natali as one of the “40 Under 40” Changemakers in the Washington D.C. Region and then named her as a “Woman to Watch.”  In 2017, the DC metro area’s largest Spanish language newspaper, El Tiempo Latino, recognized Natali Fani-González as one of the 100 most influential individuals for the DC Hispanic community. She received the Montgomery Women’s Rising Star Award.

Natali Fani-González is a member of the Transition Team for Montgomery County Executive Marc Elrich and a member of the “More Affordable and Welcoming County” committee. Natali was Vice-Chair of the Transition Team for former Prince George’s County Executive Rushern Baker III.

While on the Planning Board, Natali is a Public Engagement executive leading impactful grassroots efforts and multimillion-dollar campaigns across the nation. Natali graduated from Goucher College and completed professional studies at Georgetown University. She lives with her husband and children in Wheaton.

NL3 Jose Gonzalez

Naturally Latinos 3 - José G. González


Keynote Speaker


 

Naturally Latinos 3 - José G. González

José G. González

Founder, Director Emeritus- Latino Outdoors

Partner, The Avarna Group

José G. González is the Founder and Director Emeritus of Latino Outdoors. He is an experienced educator as a K-12 public education teacher, environmental education advisor, outdoor education instructor and coordinator, and university adjunct faculty. As a Partner in The Avarna Group and through his own consulting, his work focuses on Equity & Inclusion frameworks and practices in the environmental, outdoor, and conservation fields. He is also an illustrator and science communicator.

His commentary on diversity and environmental/outdoor equity has been featured by High Country News, Outside Magazine, Earth Island Journal, and Latino USA, among others. He engaged in collaborations with the White House Council on Environmental Quality, U.S. Department of Interior, and the National Park Service during the Obama Administration. He also represented Latino Outdoors in several coalitions including the Latino Conservation Alliance, the Next 100 Coalition, and California Parks Now. He has been recognized with several honors, including the National Wildlife Federation Environmental Educator Award, Grist Magazine “Grist 50”, and The Murie Center Spirit of the Muries, among others. You may have also seen him in various outdoor spaces or read his poetic musings.

He received his B.A at the University of California, Davis, and his M.S at the University of Michigan School of Natural Resources & Environment. His teaching coursework was at the Bilingual, Multicultural, Education Department at Sacramento State.

He serves as a Trustee for the National Outdoor Leadership School, a Trustee for the National Recreation Foundation, Resource Media Board Director, Nuestra Tierra Conservation Project Board Director, Councilor for Save the Redwoods League, and as an advisor to Blue Sky Funders Forum, among other such leadership volunteer roles.

Be Smart on Solar

NEWS ALERT

BE SMART FROM THE START ON SOLAR, ANS and CWA TELL COUNTY

Environmental groups call for thoughtful planning for solar in Montgomery County—build first on already developed lands

For Immediate Release: October 6, 2020
For more information, contact caroline.brewer@anshome.org, 240-899-9019, or eranson@cleanwater.org, 410-921-9229, or denisse.guitarra@anshome.org, 240-630-4703

CHEVY CHASE, MD – The Audubon Naturalist Society (ANS) and Clean Water Action (CWA) submitted joint testimony to the Montgomery County Council pushing for thoughtful, sustainable solar development in the County as members consider “Solar Collection System – AR Zone Standards” in the Council’s work session today.

The climate crisis demands bold investment to generate more of our energy from solar and it should go hand-in-hand with thoughtful, advance planning that will first direct solar energy to the lowest-conflict areas.

ANS and CWA argue that the County should commit to finding and prioritizing already disturbed lands such as brownfields, parking garages, utility corridors, along with rooftops and county-owned facilities. New Jersey and Massachusetts have established solar rubric scores to help policymakers plan for solar siting. Montgomery County should complete studies to do the same and prioritize placing solar on already-developed lands first instead of in the Agricultural Reserve meant to protect farmland and natural spaces.

“Montgomery County needs to be smart from the start with solar development. The county has set the ambitious goal to reach net zero of greenhouse gas emissions by the year 2035. The Climate Action Plan and the General Plan are already on this trajectory and in tune with all of the county’s climate, equity and economic needs,” said Denisse Guitarra, Maryland Conservation Advocate for ANS.

Moreover, while the Zone Texting Amendment (ZTA 20-01), claims it will require “pollinator-friendly” solar fields, the habitat these fields will provide will actually be a trap for honeybees and other critical pollinators. “Unfortunately, the state solar-pollinator program that Montgomery County is relying on allows routine spraying of pesticides on pollinator habitat - creating spaces that intentionally attract pollinating insects and then douse them in killer chemicals. To get kudos for providing habitat, routinely poisoning that habitat should be a non-starter,” said Emily Ranson, Maryland Director for Clean Water Action.

Click here to read our full testimony to the Council.

Follow ANS at Facebook.com/AudubonNaturalistSocietyTwitter.com/ANStweets and  Instagram.com/ansnature

Follow CWA at Facebook.com/CleanWaterActionMD, Twitter.com/CleanWater_MD, and Instagram.com/cleanh2oaction 

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About ANS: Throughout its 122-year history, ANS has played a pivotal role in conserving our region's iconic natural places from development including the C&O Canal, Dyke Marsh and, most recently, Ten Mile Creek. Past ANS member and board president, Rachel Carson, author of Silent Spring, is credited with launching the now global environmental movement. ANS's nature experts provide hundreds of opportunities each year for children and adults to enjoy, learn about, and protect the environment

About CWA: Clean Water Action is a national grassroots organization with 53,000 members in Maryland. For the last forty years in Maryland, Clean Water works for clean, safe, and affordable water, whether in the streams, rivers or Chesapeake Bay, or from the tap through grassroots organizing, policy work, and campaigns.

App Lets People Take Action For Water Quality

NEWS ALERT

New Mobile App Lets People Take Action for Water Quality

It’s an easy, fun and fascinating way to safely collect and report water quality data

For Immediate Release: September 30, 2020
Photos available upon request

CHEVY CHASE, MD – The Audubon Naturalist Society (ANS) and Izaak Walton League of America (IWLA) have launched a brand-new version of Creek Critters®, an innovative smartphone app that empowers people to collect valuable data and report on local water quality. Using only a smartphone and a small aquarium net, everyone can learn about stream health and become advocates for their own natural resources.

“It always fascinates me to see how excited people get by discovering life in their streams,” says Gregg Trilling, Conservation Outreach Manager for the Audubon Naturalist Society. “Creek Critters helps newcomers and experienced stream monitors alike experience that thrill of discovery.”

Water quality in the United States is under threat from a wide range of sources, from excessive road salt use to stormwater runoff. Professional water quality experts are unable to monitor even half of the more than 3.5 million miles of streams and rivers across the country. ANS and IWLA have trained community scientists for decades to collect critical water quality data and engage local communities.

Creek Critters uses simple step-by-step instructions and an interactive guide to help users find and identify organisms in local streams. Collecting and identifying these small, fascinating animals, called benthic macroinvertebrates, is one of the most effective ways to assess stream health. Benthic macroinvertebrates live in creeks and streams and have different tolerance levels to water pollution. By identifying and reporting the macroinvertebrates they find in a stream, anyone, including students, can help paint a picture of water quality and pollution threats across the country.

“For students, Creek Critters is a splashy introduction to the stunning biodiversity that can be found if you learn to look,” says Dani Moore, science teacher at Wilson High School in DC.

The data collected by app users is uploaded into the Clean Water Hub, the water quality database managed by IWLA. The first database of its kind, the Clean Water Hub brings together data collected by volunteers across the country in a single, user-friendly website.

“With the Creek Critters app now connected to the Clean Water Hub database, people across the country are empowered to do their own water quality monitoring, share their results and use their data,” says Samantha Briggs, Clean Water Program Director for IWLA.

The app can be used by people working alone or by small groups, making it an easy activity to do while social distancing. It is also family friendly and can be used by schools, camps and clubs to educate and engage students of all ages.

The free app is available for download on iOS and Android devices.

CONTACT:

Caroline Brewer
Director of Marketing and Communications
Audubon Naturalist Society
(240) 899-9019 or caroline.brewer@anshome.org

Gregg Trilling
Conservation Outreach Manager
Audubon Naturalist Society
gregg.trilling@anshome.org

Samantha Briggs
Clean Water Program Director
Izaak Walton League of America
(847) 650-5112 or sbriggs@iwla.org

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About The Izaak Walton League of America: Founded in 1922, the Izaak Walton League of America (www.iwla.org) and our more than 40,000 members protect America’s outdoors through education, community-based conservation, and promoting outdoor recreation.

About ANS: Throughout its history, ANS has championed nature for all by playing a pivotal role in conserving our region's iconic natural places from development including the C&O Canal, Dyke Marsh and, most recently, Ten Mile Creek. Past ANS member and board president, Rachel Carson, author of Silent Spring, is credited with launching the now global environmental movement. ANS's nature experts provide hundreds of opportunities each year for children and adults to enjoy, learn about, and protect the environment.

Follow ANS at: www.Facebook.com/AudubonNaturalistSociety,  www.Twitter.com/ANStweet 
and @ANSNature on Instagram.

Moco Should Replace Lost Trees

NEWS ALERT

MONTGOMERY COUNTY SHOULD REPLACE ALL TREES LOST TO DEVELOPMENT 

ANS and regional partners push adoption of net zero loss law – a substantial change

For more information, contact caroline.brewer@anshome.org, or 240-899-9019, or eliza.cava@anshome.org, or 305-310-7149, or denisse.guitarra@anshome.org, 240-630-4703 

For Immediate Release – September 22, 2020 

CHEVY CHASE, MD  The Audubon Naturalist Society (ANS) and its partners are testifying before the Montgomery County Council this afternoon to push for an amendment that would substantially and meaningfully change the county’s Forest Conservation Law. The amendment insists on a net zero forest loss, similar to the strongest Maryland forest regulations, recently passed by the Fredrick County Council this summer. Currently the county requires that only 25 percent of trees lost to development be replaced. Net zero means that 100 percent of trees lost would have to be replaced.

“Trees clean our air and play a major role in helping us adapt to climate change by reducing urban heat island effects- they basically act as a natural thermostat. It’s critical that the Council step into its role as an environmental leader, propose and adopt a net zero forest loss amendment as part of Bill 36-20,” said Denisse Guitarra,” Maryland Advocate for ANS.

More tree coverage would help to reduce stormwater runoff from heavy and frequent storms already being experienced by all throughout our region (See Sep 2020 DMV floods). Tree roots help hold onto the soil, and can absorb more rain. This mitigates runoff that pollutes our streams and rivers and eventually our Chesapeake Bay. Furthermore, trees are a major part of helping us adapt to climate change by reducing urban heat island effects.

Click here to read our testimony and blog on this topic.


Our forest fight partners include:

MD League of Conservation Voters 
Rock Creek Conservancy
Potomac Conservancy
The Chesapeake Bay Foundation

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Follow ANS at: www.Facebook.com/AudubonNaturalistSociety,  www.Twitter.com/ANStweet 
and @ANSNature on Instagram.

 About ANS: Throughout its history, ANS has championed nature for all by playing a pivotal role in conserving our region's iconic natural places from development including the C&O Canal, Dyke Marsh and, most recently, Ten Mile Creek. Past ANS member and board president, Rachel Carson, author of Silent Spring, is credited with launching the now global environmental movement. ANS's nature experts provide hundreds of opportunities each year for children and adults to enjoy, learn about, and protect the environment.

ANS Will Keep Up The Pressure

NEWS ALERT

ANS WILL KEEP UP THE PRESSURE TO ALTER 'SHORT-SIGHTED' BELTWAY/I-270 EXPANSION

Organization's opposition based on threats to people, wildlife, and the environment

For more information and to arrange interviews with speakers, contact caroline.brewer@anshome.org, or 240-899-9019, eliza.cava@anshome.org, or 202-503-9141, or lglisagoodnight@gmail.com, or 301-523-5394

For Immediate Release – August 27, 2020

Chevy Chase, MD – Lisa Alexander, the executive director of the Audubon Naturalist Society, on Tuesday, Aug. 25 voiced the organization’s opposition to the Beltway/I-270 expansion project that will lock in traffic and development patterns for the next 50 years, impose enormous financial risks, and threaten the lives of people, wildlife, and the environment.

“In the face of dual crises of Climate Change and the Covid Pandemic, expanding a roadway at the expense of water quality, parkland and tree cover is short-sighted,” Alexander said in her testimony which was included in WTOP’s coverage of the issue.

Eliza Cava, ANS’s Director of Conservation, will offer additional testimony at a hearing scheduled for September 3. She’ll discuss how the proposed expansion would increase air pollution, noise pollution, and stormwater pollution. The Beltway I-495/I-270 Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) is out for public comment review until Oct. 8. ANS is part of a coalition that has been working toward providing alternatives to the expansion and demanding a more transparent process.  ANS’s Beltway Blog offers information on how to testify/submit written comment.

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Follow ANS at: www.Facebook.com/AudubonNaturalistSociety,  www.Twitter.com/ANStweet 
and @ANSNature on Instagram.

 About ANS: Throughout its history, ANS has championed nature for all by playing a pivotal role in conserving our region's iconic natural places from development including the C&O Canal, Dyke Marsh and, most recently, Ten Mile Creek. Past ANS member and board president, Rachel Carson, author of Silent Spring, is credited with launching the now global environmental movement. ANS's nature experts provide hundreds of opportunities each year for children and adults to enjoy, learn about, and protect the environment.

Online series features diverse nature experts

NEWS ALERT

ANS’S NEW ONLINE NATURALIST HOUR HELPS NATURE LOVERS STAY CONNECTED TO EACH OTHER AND THE OUTDOORS

The organizer of Black Birders Week, UMD’s “Bug Guy” and Marine Biologist from The National Aquarium among speakers

For Immediate Release: August 14, 2020
For more information and to arrange interviews with speakers, contact caroline.brewer@anshome.org, or 240-899-9019, or lglisagoodnight@gmail.com, or 301-523-5394

CHEVY CHASE, MD – Back to school isn’t just for kids. The Audubon Naturalist Society is helping nature lovers (of all ages and stages of curiosity) boost their nature IQ and stay in touch with nature – even if they’re indoors -- in new and diverse ways. The Naturalist Hour, a new monthly series of online talks presented by experts in entomology, marine biology, birds, and more, provides a hot topic for discussion for all who are nature curious. Topics range from sharks and reptiles to crickets, ferns, and fungi. The speakers are diverse, too. They range in age – from their 20s to 70 and older – and come from black, white, Latinx, Asian racial and ethnic backgrounds. Most hail from the DMV region, with talks that are highly specialized, such as a recent one called Wild Sex (How birds, bees, and orchids procreate) and others that are more general, such as the upcoming primer on the true nature of sharks.

On Tuesday, August 18th, at 7 p.m., the National Aquarium’s Education Programs Manager, Symone Johnson Barkley, will present Perceptions of Sharks: Is the ‘Man-Eating’ Fear Justified?

Thursday’s, August 20th 7 p.m. presentation Seasons of Change: From Black Birders Week to Fall Migration, will be given by the National Audubon Society’s Tykee James, a co-founder of Black Birders Week. James was recently quoted in the CNN article:  “A bird named for a Confederate general officially has a new identity.”

The final two speakers for August are Longwood Garden’s Lea Johnson and the University of Maryland’s Mike Raupp, who has been featured on The Tonight Show, NPR, and in the New York Times. Johnson’s August 25th talk “The Bluebirds of Longwood Gardens” will touch upon efforts to preserve the species. Raupp’s August 27th talk “Cicada Safari: An Exploration of a Periodical Wonder” will provide deep insight into these fascinating creatures ahead of their expected mass emergence in 2021.

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Follow ANS at: www.Facebook.com/AudubonNaturalistSociety,  www.Twitter.com/ANStweet 
and @ANSNature on Instagram.

 About ANS: Throughout its history, ANS has championed nature for all by playing a pivotal role in conserving our region's iconic natural places from development including the C&O Canal, Dyke Marsh and, most recently, Ten Mile Creek. Past ANS member and board president, Rachel Carson, author of Silent Spring, is credited with launching the now global environmental movement. ANS's nature experts provide hundreds of opportunities each year for children and adults to enjoy, learn about, and protect the environment.

Fairfax Vote Outrages Environmentalists

NEWS ALERT

FAIRFAX CITY COUNCIL VOTE TO DESTROY STREAM AND FOREST OUTRAGES ANS, ENVIRONMENTAL GROUPS

For Immediate Release – July 15, 2020

For more information, contact caroline.brewer@anshome.org, or 240-899-9019, Renee Grebe, renee.grebe@anshome.org, 703-261-4668, lglisagoodnight@gmail.com, or 301-523-5394

FAIRFAX, VA – The Audubon Naturalist Society (ANS) and dozens of Fairfax City residents were outraged over the granting of a special exception late Tuesday night which paves the way for the elimination of a living stream and forest.

The Fairfax City Council hosted a public hearing on the rezoning and Master Development Plan of the Northfax West property. ANS strongly supports and encourages redevelopment to improve land use economically and environmentally. In this case, however, the economics for the developer appeared to be prioritized over the City’s current ecological protections.

With several Council members reading prepared remarks, Council unanimously approved the development proposal without modifications requested by residents and conservation organizations. “The City encompasses the headwaters of Accotink Creek, home to fish, salamanders, buffered by a forest with birds and other wildlife. They should not have traded away this precious natural space for man-made green infrastructure and stream restorations,” ANS Northern Virginia Conservation Advocate Renee Grebe said.

Although he voted to approve the project, Councilmember Yi, answering without prepared remarks, passionately stated “The way we do things is most concerning to me,” highlighting the desire for independent consultants to help evaluate development projects. “People will walk away thinking ‘The Council did not listen to us.’” He continued: “We heard you and what you said is very important and it’s been weighing on me.”

The City approval
Nearly 70% of the 25 speakers opposed the current proposal and requested a delay to allow for alternative proposals that preserve the A1 section of the North Fork and would not require a special exception to the Chesapeake Bay Preservation Ordinance. Similarly, nearly 90% of the comments on the City’s comment2Fairfax portal opposed the plan.

This development proposal raised several concerns. The biggest concern is the special exception granted to ignore stream protections, setting a terrible precedent statewide to allow building on protected land as an economic necessity to expand urban areas.

“The City Council did not request alternative development plans from the applicant. Instead, the City chose decades-old solutions for dealing with streams and natural floodplains –simply put the water in a pipe. Green infrastructure and stream restorations should be used to help minimize impacts to our urban streams, not as a replacement for them,” said Grebe.

BACKGROUND
Tucked away from a sea of parking lots and close to a major road intersection is a 5-acre patch of forest and stream that hosts a variety of life, from barred owls to salamanders. This same area, Northfax, is projected to be an area of economic growth within the City of Fairfax. But to grow, redevelopment of the current activity center is needed.

Northfax West is one of the last properties in this area to be rezoned and it includes this portion of the North Fork of Accotink Creek and its associated forested Resource Protection Area. After many years of consolidating more than a dozen individual lots, and a few years of planning the proposal, the Northfax West proposal came before the Planning Commission and City Council for a vote.

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Follow ANS at: www.Facebook.com/AudubonNaturalistSociety,  www.Twitter.com/ANStweet 
and @ANSNature on Instagram.

 About ANS: Throughout its history, ANS has championed nature for all by playing a pivotal role in conserving our region's iconic natural places from development including the C&O Canal, Dyke Marsh and, most recently, Ten Mile Creek. Past ANS member and board president, Rachel Carson, author of Silent Spring, is credited with launching the now global environmental movement. ANS's nature experts provide hundreds of opportunities each year for children and adults to enjoy, learn about, and protect the environment.

Parents Praise New ANS Camps

NEWS ALERT

 PARENTS CRAVING MORE INSTRUCTION FOR CHILDREN GIVE NEW ANS CAMPS HIGH PRAISE

Provide intellectual boost following disruptions to learning because of COVID-19

For Immediate Release – July 2, 2020
For more information, contact caroline.brewer@anshome.org, or 240-899-9019, or lglisagoodnight@gmail.com, or 301-523-5394

CHEVY CHASE, MD – The Audubon Naturalist Society's new line-up of summer camps with options that include nature photography and filmography are getting high praise from parents. One mom said her son was "really energized by the interactions in camp, and has continued to spend time outside taking photographs since the camp ended" and called the experience "a great example of how some engagement and guidance really benefits kids."

Nature Film at Home, for rising 7th -9th graders, will be held the week of July 6. Campers will learn how to shoot and edit their own short nature film on their smartphones. Classes will be held via Zoom from 10-11 am and 3-4 pm with an additional 1-2 hours of self-led outdoor prompts and activities per day. The Nature Photography at Home Camp will be offered the week of July 13 for 6th-9th graders. Classes are held via Zoom from 10-11 a.m. and 2-3 p.m. with an additional 1-2 hours of self-led outdoor prompts and activities per day.

Those programs, along with Audubon Advocacy and Backyard Exploration Packs, are part of a new offering of camps in 2020 that give young people around the region the benefit of learning about their surroundings from environmental educators who are carrying out ANS's 123-year-legacy of enjoying, protecting, and teaching about nature.

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Follow ANS at: www.Facebook.com/AudubonNaturalistSociety,  www.Twitter.com/ANStweet 
and @ANSNature on Instagram.

 About ANS: Throughout its history, ANS has championed nature for all by playing a pivotal role in conserving our region's iconic natural places from development including the C&O Canal, Dyke Marsh and, most recently, Ten Mile Creek. Past ANS member and board president, Rachel Carson, author of Silent Spring, is credited with launching the now global environmental movement. ANS's nature experts provide hundreds of opportunities each year for children and adults to enjoy, learn about, and protect the environment.

Northfax West Development

NEWS ALERT

ANS PLEASED WITH DELAYED HEARING BY FAIRFAX CITY COUNCIL ON NORTHFAX WEST DEVELOPMENT

Urges Council to listen to the community following Planning Commission's approval

For more information, contact caroline.brewer@anshome.org, or 240-899-9019, or Renee Grebe, renee.grebe@anshome.org, 703-261-4668; or lglisagoodnight@gmail.com, or 301-523-5394

For Immediate Release – June 24, 2020

Chevy Chase, MD - The Planning Commission this week hosted a public hearing on the rezoning and Master Development Plan of the Northfax West property. Significant concerns were raised by the Audubon Naturalist Society and the public, with nearly three-fourths of the 20 speakers asking for a delay to allow for alternative proposals that preserve more of the natural area. Monday's vote was 6-1 vote in favor of approval.

At the Tuesday, June 23 City Council meeting, several important public hearings scheduled for that evening were postponed until July 14th, including Northfax West and the Farr Avenue road extension.

“This delay is a wise decision by the City Council. It was our chief ask. We hope this means Council members will leave themselves enough time to fully absorb the public’s concerns and explore alternatives to putting this living stream in a culvert underground, while still shaping a valuable Activity Center for the City of Fairfax,” said ANS Northern Virginia Conservation Advocate Renee Grebe. “This project has been underway for a long time and taking a few more months to respond to public input is prudent given the new information we have uncovered.”

City Council discussed a variety of environmental concerns in regards to the Northfax Small Area Plan, particularly in regards to the assumed culverting of the North Fork of Accotink Creek, however, the Council ultimately unanimously approved the Northfax Small Area Plan, paving the way for the Northfax West development plan to now be in line with the City’s vision document which supersedes the Comprehensive Plan.

“This is an unfortunate scenario of the tail wagging the dog. This Small Area Plan should be guiding the City towards a vision, not having a developer guide the City to a vision,” Grebe said.

Additional Background on the Project

Tucked away from a sea of parking lots and close to a major road intersection is a five-acre patch of forest and stream that hosts a variety of life, from barred owls to salamanders. This same area, Northfax, is projected to be an area of economic growth within the City of Fairfax. But to grow, redevelopment of the current activity center is needed.

Northfax West is one of the last properties in this area to be rezoned and it includes this portion of the North Fork of Accotink Creek and its associated forested Resource Protection Area. After many years of consolidating over a dozen individual lots, and a few years of planning the proposal, the Northfax West proposal came before the Planning Commission and City Council for a vote.

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Follow ANS at: www.Facebook.com/AudubonNaturalistSociety,  www.Twitter.com/ANStweet 
and @ANSNature on Instagram.

 About ANS: Throughout its history, ANS has championed nature for all by playing a pivotal role in conserving our region's iconic natural places from development including the C&O Canal, Dyke Marsh and, most recently, Ten Mile Creek. Past ANS member and board president, Rachel Carson, author of Silent Spring, is credited with launching the now global environmental movement. ANS's nature experts provide hundreds of opportunities each year for children and adults to enjoy, learn about, and protect the environment.