Category Archives: Taking Nature Black

Sean Terry

Sean Terry is a seasoned urban planning and community development professional with 15+ years’ experience across multiple business frameworks: non-profit organizations, municipalities, public-sector agencies and private businesses. Terry has successfully thrived while pursuing the execution of capital improvements that upgrade the physical environment and enhance the quality of life for residents. In these roles, Terry has worked to administer project management of infrastructure and related capital improvements; facilitated stakeholder engagement and public input processes with an emphasis on project coordination, stakeholder management, and external communications; and has delivered research and technical assistance across complementary park design areas such as bike/pedestrian advocacy, Placemaking, environmental sustainability, and economic development.

Sean Terry is a seasoned urban planning and community development professional with 15+ years’ experience across multiple business frameworks: non-profit organizations, municipalities, public-sector agencies and private businesses.

Terry has successfully thrived while pursuing the execution of capital improvements that upgrade the physical environment and enhance the quality of life for residents.

In these roles, he has worked to administer project management of infrastructure and related capital improvements; facilitated stakeholder engagement and public input processes with an emphasis on project coordination, stakeholder management, and external communications; and has delivered research and technical assistance across complementary park design areas such as bike/pedestrian advocacy, Placemaking, environmental sustainability, and economic development.

As the Ohio Parks for People Program Director, Terry is directly responsible for local (Cleveland) goal alignment and execution of The Trust for Public Land’s 10MW initiative to ensure that every person in the country, particularly every child, lives within a 10-minute walk to a park, playground or open space.

In his current role, Terry provides leadership and input to further The Trust for Public Land local efforts around parks planning in Ohio by utilizing stakeholder facilitation and capacity building to broaden reach of 10MW, administer programming with emphasis on local park development opportunities in/around Cleveland, deliver equitable access to functional park spaces.

Donna Kirkland

Newark native Donna Kirkland joined The Trust for Public Land in 2006 as an intern for the Parks for People - Newark program and became a full-time staffer a year later. Kirkland engages youth and community members in participatory design and long-term stewardship of The Trust for Public Land’s completed and future parks and playgrounds. She works closely with community-based committees at project sites to help them grow into their role as local stewards. She is also a liaison with schools, local government, police, and other organizations. Kirkland’s experience includes hospice work, running summer art programs, teaching children with behavioral challenges, Art Director for Street Warriors, Inc., Girl Scout team leader, and American Cancer Society Relay for Life team leader.

Newark native Donna Kirkland joined The Trust for Public Land in 2006 as an intern for the Parks for People - Newark program and became a full-time staffer a year later. Kirkland engages youth and community members in participatory design and long-term stewardship of The Trust for Public Land’s completed and future parks and playgrounds. She works closely with community-based committees at project sites to help them grow into their role as local stewards. She is also a liaison with schools, local government, police, and other organizations.

Kirkland’s experience includes hospice work, running summer art programs, teaching children with behavioral challenges, Art Director for Street Warriors, Inc., Girl Scout team leader, and American Cancer Society Relay for Life team leader.

Fred Tutman

Fred Tutman is one of the longest serving riverkeepers in the Chesapeake region and the only African American riverkeeper in the United States. He is a grassroots community advocate for clean water in Maryland’s longest and deepest intrastate waterway. He holds the title of Patuxent Riverkeeper, which is also the name of the organization that he founded in 2004. He was recently featured in the national magazine, Waterkeepers, and explained that, “In some ways, Patuxent Riverkeeper is a cross-cultural bridge between the have and the have-nots in this watershed, fighting some of the most controversial battles and, frankly, the hardest to fund.”

MODERATOR

Fred Tutman is one of the longest serving riverkeepers in the Chesapeake region and the only African American riverkeeper in the United States. He is a grassroots community advocate for clean water in Maryland’s longest and deepest intrastate waterway. He holds the title of Patuxent Riverkeeper, which is also the name of the organization that he founded in 2004. He was recently featured in the national magazine, Waterkeepers, and explained that, “In some ways, Patuxent Riverkeeper is a cross-cultural bridge between the have and the have-nots in this watershed, fighting some of the most controversial battles and, frankly, the hardest to fund.”

In the same piece, Eagle Harbor, MD Mayor James Crudup spoke to Tutman’s significant impact on his small community. “Before Fred we didn’t have anyone that we could turn to and find out what was going on in regard to the town’s waterfront. Recently he was very instrumental in our receiving grants from the Department of Environmental Resources, including a $100,000 grant to help creek flooding and erosion.” Over 16 years, Patuxent Riverkeeper has litigated 19 cases and prevailed in eight of them, winning nearly a half-billion dollars in judicial penalties, fines and reparations from polluters. Tutman is known as a thoughtful listener, skilled strategist, and dogged fighter for what’s right.

Fred also lives and works on an active farm located near the Patuxent that has been his family’s ancestral home for nearly a century. Prior to river keeping, Tutman spent nearly three decades as a media producer and consultant on telecommunications assignments across the globe. In 2020, he was named a Taking Nature Black National Environmental Champion.

Darius Johnson

Darius Johnson is a native of Maryland's Eastern Shore and the Communications Manager for Eastern Shore Land Conservancy. He is a 2021 National Fellow for the Environmental Leadership Program and he serves on the Board of Directors for Stories of the Chesapeake Heritage Area, Alumni Board for Washington College, and other organizations around the Eastern Shore. Johnson has worked for Prometric, The Fund for Johns Hopkins Medicine, and Maryland Center for Construction Education and Innovation. He is an alumna of Washington College's Class of 2015, where he studied Business Management, Economics, Philosophy, and Political Science.

MODERATOR

Darius Johnson is a native of Maryland's Eastern Shore and the Communications Manager for Eastern Shore Land Conservancy. He is a 2021 National Fellow for the Environmental Leadership Program and he serves on the Board of Directors for Stories of the Chesapeake Heritage Area, Alumni Board for Washington College, and other organizations around the Eastern Shore. Johnson has worked for Prometric, The Fund for Johns Hopkins Medicine, and Maryland Center for Construction Education and Innovation.

Johnson is an alumna of Washington College's Class of 2015, where he studied Business Management, Economics, Philosophy, and Political Science.

Jesse J. Holland

Jesse J. Holland is the Saturday host of C-SPAN's Washington Journal and an assistant professor of media and public affairs at The George Washington University. He was a longtime political reporter for the Associated Press covering Race & Ethnicity as well as the White House, the Supreme Court and the Congress, as well as state politics in the South and in New York state. He is the editor of the upcoming Black Panther: Tales of Wakanda prose anthology and the author of the Black Panther: Who Is The Black Panther? prose novel, which was nominated for an NAACP Image Award in 2019. Jesse is also the author The Invisibles: The Untold Story of African American Slaves Inside The White House and Black Men Built The Capitol: Discovering African American History In and Around Washington, D.C.

MODERATOR

Jesse J. Holland is the Saturday host of C-SPAN's Washington Journal and an assistant professor of media and public affairs at The George Washington University. He was a longtime political reporter for the Associated Press covering Race & Ethnicity as well as the White House, the Supreme Court and the Congress, as well as state politics in the South and in New York state.

He is the editor of the upcoming Black Panther: Tales of Wakanda prose anthology and the author of the Black Panther: Who Is The Black Panther? prose novel, which was nominated for an NAACP Image Award in 2019. Jesse is also the author The Invisibles: The Untold Story of African American Slaves Inside The White House and Black Men Built The Capitol: Discovering African American History In and Around Washington, D.C.

E. Fatimah Hasan

E. Fatimah Hasan is a planner coordinator with the MD-National Capital Park and Planning Commission. Her work focuses on the agricultural preservation program for Prince George’s County, food equity, and green infrastructure elements of the County’s 2017 Resource Conservation Plan. She is partnering with the University of Maryland on projects promoting food equity for residents with limited access to healthy food, and linking farmers producing plants, dyes, or fibers with textile artists who, through their arts and crafts, sustain the culture and economies of communities in the African Diaspora.

MODERATOR

E. Fatimah Hasan is a planner coordinator with the MD-National Capital Park and Planning Commission. Her work focuses on the agricultural preservation program for Prince George’s County, food equity, and green infrastructure elements of the County’s 2017 Resource Conservation Plan.

She is partnering with the University of Maryland on projects promoting food equity for residents with limited access to healthy food, and linking farmers producing plants, dyes, or fibers with textile artists who, through their arts and crafts, sustain the culture and economies of communities in the African Diaspora. She has lent her expertise to bringing women farmers of color together for land conservation learning circles. Her work with the County Council’s Agricultural Resources Advisory Committee, and with urban and rural farmers in the Ujamaa Cooperative Farming Alliance, has inspired her to improve the local food system and community health through closer connections to local farmers and the natural environment.

She holds a Bachelor of Science degree from Howard University, and a Master of City and Regional Planning from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Dr. Evelyn Cooper

Dr. Evelyn E. Cooper became the assistant dean for academic programs the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Maryland (UMD) in 2012. In this role, she oversees AGNR’s student support services and serves as the director of retention, diversity, and inclusion initiatives. She has implemented several student programs and initiatives for AGNR and the campus community, including the Summer Opportunities in Agricultural Research and the Environment (SOARE at UMD) and Ag Discovery at UMD, both initiatives geared towards encouraging underrepresented students to pursue agricultural and environmental careers. As an educator and administrator, Dr. Cooper seeks innovative ways to foster a dynamic learning environment and to promote high quality experiences through her leadership.

MODERATOR

Dr. Evelyn E. Cooper became the assistant dean for academic programs the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Maryland (UMD) in 2012. In this role, she oversees AGNR’s student support services and serves as the director of retention, diversity, and inclusion initiatives. She has implemented several student programs and initiatives for AGNR and the campus community, including the Summer Opportunities in Agricultural Research and the Environment (SOARE at UMD) and Ag Discovery at UMD, both initiatives geared towards encouraging underrepresented students to pursue agricultural and environmental careers. As an educator and administrator, Dr. Cooper seeks innovative ways to foster a dynamic learning environment and to promote high quality experiences through her leadership.

Dr. Cooper has been involved in university teaching, research, program development, and administration at UMD for more than 25 years. She joined UMD from Grambling State University, where she served as an assistant professor in the Geography, History and Philosophy Department. She earned her Ph.D. and M.S. degree in Geographical Science at UMD and her B.S. degree in Geographical Science with a concentration in Earth Science at North Carolina Central University.

Ronda Chapman

Ronda Chapman is The Trust for Public Land’s first Equity Director, where she leads and advises every aspect of the organization’s Equity strategy. She currently sits on the Boards of Directors for the River Network, Groundwork Richmond, and the Center for Diversity and the Environment. She also holds a position on the National Wildlife Federation’s Women in Conservation Leadership Advisory Council, and is a member of the Green Leadership Trust. She previously served on the Georgetown Climate Center Equity Advisory Committee and was a Commissioner for the DC Commission on Climate and Environmental Justice.

MODERATOR

Ronda Chapman has led a very rich and versatile life in her career and in the outdoors. Born and raised in the Washington, DC metropolitan area, she found her way to the Wasatch Mountains of Utah where she met her first love at the age of 20: snow. She was an avid snowboarder and skier during a period of time when people of color were rarely seen engaging in these activities. She thrived as an athlete and anomaly. Her decade as a “ski bum” shaped her professional career in unanticipated ways. For the last twenty years, Chapman has led efforts on water infrastructure and equity, renewable energy, climate resilience, and waste management in municipal, higher education, and non-profit sectors. She has dedicated her thought leadership towards advancing racial equity, diversity, justice, and inclusion principles in various professional and community-centered capacities. As a skilled facilitator, Chapman derives great joy convening leaders who are committed to the possibilities of equitable communities.

Today, Chapman is The Trust for Public Land’s first Equity Director, where she leads and advises every aspect of the organization’s Equity strategy.

She currently sits on the Boards of Directors for the River Network, Groundwork Richmond, and the Center for Diversity and the Environment. She also holds a position on the National Wildlife Federation’s Women in Conservation Leadership Advisory Council, and is a member of the Green Leadership Trust. She previously served on the Georgetown Climate Center Equity Advisory Committee and was a Commissioner for the DC Commission on Climate and Environmental Justice.

Jasmine Brown

Jasmine K. Brown is a forestry doctoral student at Michigan State University, an interdisciplinary scholar, and social scientist. Her research interests include racial and gender diversity in natural resources, but more specifically, the enduring history of African Americans in forests and forestry. Brown serves as a Steering Committee member for the Women’s Forest Congress. She is also an active member of the Society of American Foresters Diversity and Inclusion Working Group, and MANRRS (Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences).

MODERATOR

Jasmine K. Brown is a forestry doctoral student at Michigan State University, an interdisciplinary scholar, and social scientist. Her research interests include racial and gender diversity in natural resources, but more specifically, the enduring history of African Americans in forests and forestry. Brown serves as a Steering Committee member for the Women’s Forest Congress. She is also an active member of the Society of American Foresters Diversity and Inclusion Working Group, and MANRRS (Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences).

Brown previously worked with the U.S. Forest Service as a traveling Forestry Technician and Pathways Intern. Brown holds a Bachelor’s degree in Natural Resources from the University of Connecticut and a Master’s degree in Forest Ecosystems and Society from Oregon State University.

Ralph Bouquet

Ralph Bouquet is the Director of Education and Outreach for NOVA, the PBS science documentary series produced by GBH Boston. At NOVA, Bouquet and his team support science educators through the creation of free classroom resources and engage new audiences for NOVA’s broadcast and digital productions through inclusive science communication events around the country. Their newest initiative, the NOVA Science Studio, is a youth science communication program that empowers young people to produce short-form videos about the issues that matter to them.

MODERATOR

Ralph Bouquet is the Director of Education and Outreach for NOVA, the PBS science documentary series produced by GBH Boston. At NOVA, Bouquet and his team support science educators through the creation of free classroom resources and engage new audiences for NOVA’s broadcast and digital productions through inclusive science communication events around the country. Their newest initiative, the NOVA Science Studio, is a youth science communication program that empowers young people to produce short-form videos about the issues that matter to them.

Before NOVA, Bouquet taught high school biology and chemistry in Philadelphia and worked in ed-tech at a Boston-based startup. He earned his B.A. at Harvard University.