ANS Thrilled Nanjemoy Forest Has Been Saved

NEWS ALERT

ANS THRILLED NANJEMOY FOREST HAS BEEN SAVED BY MDE DENIAL OF TWO WETLANDS PERMITS

Georgetown Solar Farm Would Have Caused Irreparable Harm

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - Wednesday, August 28, 2019 

For more information, contact Director of Marketing and Communications, caroline.brewer@anshome.org, or Director of Conservation Eliza Cava, eliza.cava@anshome.org. 

CHEVY CHASE, MD - From Eliza Cava, ANS Director of Conservation

"We're thrilled with the news from the Maryland Department of the Environment that it has denied two wetlands permits for the Georgetown University proposal to build a solar farm in the Nanjemoy Forest. Georgetown's proposal would have caused irreparable harm to wildlife, streams in the last high quality forest in Southern Maryland. Environmental tragedies are everywhere - the Amazon is burning, entire species are disappearing and being threatened right here in our region, and crops are dying. Today though, Nanjemoy Forest was saved by hundreds of people working together across the DC region, and by Secretary Ben Grumbles and the Maryland Department of the Environment's denial late yesterday of wetlands permits for two proposed solar farms to be built by Origis Energy for Georgetown in Charles County.

We are so grateful to the Maryland Department of the Environment for its careful consideration of the environmental impacts of this project, and to the many partners who worked tirelessly to protect this land. Solar energy has the potential to move us towards a more just and sustainable society, but only if done right. We hope that Georgetown and Origis will be able to find a more suitable site for the solar farm and commend them on working towards climate change mitigation."

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 About ANS: Throughout its history, ANS has championed nature for all by playing a pivotal role in conserving our region's iconic natural places from development including the C&O Canal, Dyke Marsh and, most recently, Ten Mile Creek. Past ANS member and board president, Rachel Carson, author of Silent Spring, is credited with launching the now global environmental movement. ANS's nature experts provide hundreds of opportunities each year for children and adults to enjoy, learn about, and protect the environment.